If you’ve been around here for a while, you’ve more than likely heard us talking about our sister company Studio Go, which is an on-site dance education company. You may have found yourself asking, “What in the world are they even talking about?” Or, you may have seen other companies out there attempting this business model and (how do I put this lightly?) not necessarily executing it very well…

 

Today, I’m going to introduce you to Studio Go, and I plan to dispel some myths about our approach to dance education. Lastly, I will tell you why your studio should have an on-site leg as well. If you’re not a studio owner, you may be an on-site one by the end of this blog post. 😉

1. Meet, Studio Go

First, I encourage you to visit our website by clicking HERE! Studio Go is a mobile dance studio committed to providing the best in on-site dance and movement throughout Atlanta, Athens, Charleston and Chattanooga. Basically, we partner with schools, churches, preschools, synagogues, rec centers, and community centers to provide dance instruction to a variety of ages, mostly focusing on the preschool ages. We realize that we are tasked with more than just teaching dance, we also aim to create a caring, nurturing environment where kids can be themselves. In our program, children learn proper technique and concepts of dance, all while learning self-awareness, grace, poise, social skills, and much more inside the comfort of their own learning environment.

 

The long and short of the company’s inception is that Leah (and I) both worked for a different company that offers the same type of services. But, Leah had fabulous ideas for taking it to the next level. We wanted to bring dance education into the 21st century with technology, current educational trends, and modern music/resources that best serve the young family of today. Studio Go is dominating our industry in the Southeastern US, if we must say so ourselves; however, our parents & location partners say the EXACT same thing.

 

“I have known Leah for three years both as a colleague and as my son’s movement teacher at the Alefbet preschool. As a teacher in the preschool I have had the opportunity to observe Leah’s professional skills as well as interpersonal style. She is always pleasant and full of energy, with a big smile on her face. In her class she makes sure to welcome each child and provide individual attention. The children love her and look forward to her class every week. The classes include both a mix of routines that the children love and new activities and music from week to week to keep expanding their skills.
Leah has been very professional in working with the rest of the staff at the preschool in cases where children are delayed in gross motor skill development. She has provided good advice in helping us with activities to encourage development in needed areas for these children.”

— Parent & Studio Go Partner Employee

 

 

2. Dispelling the myths!

A- This is a cheesy, rag-tag approach to dance.

Simply put, NOPE. It’s all about your approach. Scroll back up and look at our SG logo. Does that branding/messaging read “we don’t know what we’re doing and these are super corny, cheap classes.” Not in my book!

 

If you put quality content at the top of your business’ priority list, you won’t face this problem at all. A perfect example of this is our monthly preschool dance subscription.  It was created for Studio Go initially, but is now used in physical dance studios all over the world. Shameless plug. 😉 Our curtains are currently closed for enrollment, but they’ll open back up in the summer of 2019! If you have questions, email us cheers@studiotogodance.com and we’ll fill you in on all the juicy deets!

 

Whether you own a physical studio or an on-site one, you control your own quality. Your instructional skills and desire for solid classes will follow you, whether you’re teaching a kid how to perform a “tendu” in a beautiful NYC ballet studio, in your local gym, or in a church fellowship hall. WE PROMISE. 

 

B- The kids won’t receive a top-notch education because there are no ballet barres or mirrors in their classes.

This is a very common statement that we hear in our line of work. Let’s talk, dance professional to dance professional for a sec. Remember when I said that we mainly focus on preschool ages? That’s typically the “meat” of our clients. I’m going to say 3-5 year-olds are about 95% of our clientele. In what dance studio is this age-range allowed at a ballet barre? Mayyyybe that’s the case for a 5 year-old at the very end of the school year, who has been taking dance since the age of 2. However, to maintain a proper class for the others who may have started dance this year, most ballet teachers will NEVER let kids this age head to the barre. It’s not the right size for them yet, it’s a behavioral distraction to deal with the temptation to swing on said barre, and the technique that they are working on simply doesn’t require this tool yet. 

 

As for the mirrors, y’all. Y’all. Y’ALL! That’s one of my biggest pet-peeves when teaching 3 year-olds in a studio. Love it, love them, love my job. Truly! But, they are so incredibly distracted by seeing themselves in that massive mirror. I’ve met instructors who don’t allow preschoolers to face the front of the room in class due to this problem. You know! I don’t blame the little guys. It’s quite appealing and interesting to see oneself in that way. It’s pretty, sparkly and drives the imagination to exciting stories and thoughts. I get it! You’re little and you’re mesmerized, but we have a class to run here! Trust us, not having mirrors in our classes is NOT a bad thing. 😉

 

(We do instruct several toddler classes down to a year-and-a-half or two. Same thing I stated above applies here. They won’t be anywhere near a barre for a lonnnng time. Additionally, we do offer several Elementary classes that range from Kindergartners to “3rd-ish” grade. Keep in mind, most of these kids are recreational dancers. They are looking for an activity to keep them healthy and active. In most of these situations we are contracted by a 3rd party afterschool program who is looking for vendors to provide skills and services to their clients to keep kiddos entertained and busy in the 3pm-5pm range of time after school. Again, these parents are more than likely not looking to send their kid to Julliard. We are there to teach them a new skill, expose them to art, and keep them active! Those are 3 things that are totally possible without a barre or mirrors.) 

 

C- I’m going to miss my physical ballet studio if I leave it and open an on-site studio.

First of all, you don’t have to leave your studio to open an on-site portion of your company. In fact, this route could end up being a feeder program to your studio. Offer classes during those coveted daytime slots at schools and local facilities that offer young childcare. Then, when they “graduate” and are still serious about continuing their dance education, badda bing badda boom… Come on over to my studio in the afternoons! (You can thank us later!)

 

Secondly, there are MUCH fewer overhead expenses for an on-site studio. $$$ That means higher profits for you! $$$ You’re not paying a power bill during this class time, you’re not repairing ruined marley floors for these classes, and you’re not having to staff a front-desk worker for it either. And those examples merely scratch the surface! You may miss the beauty of your studio room, but you won’t miss paying for that expensive heat in the middle of the winter!

 

Also, if you did decide to go solely the on-site route, you can still teach at another dance studio in the evenings if you miss the physical space and older kids that much. We have many instructors who work for us up until 4pm, and then they head straight to the studio afterwards! Take our word for it… Again, you won’t miss paying those bills, constantly refilling the toilet paper dispenser and wondering where ALL OF THOSE d@#$ CRUMBS KEEP COMING FROM in your lobby!!!! Been there, done that.

 

D- How do you teach a dance class in a school cafeteria, gym stage, or preschool classroom?

E- I have no clue where to even start in creating this kind of business.

I’m going to loop “D” and “E” into one answer with a pretty little bow on top. Beginning Feb 22nd, we are launching our online course “Beyond the Studio,” which has been created with these very questions in mind. We will walk our customers through the process from setting up the business, to hiring the right people (they are very different from studio-only teachers), to establishing proper systems of a remotely run company, to equipping your staff to teach on the go, to legal considerations that are unique to this business model. This is a brief overview of the topics we’ll cover, but we are very thorough and no stone is left un-turned from our YEARS of experience successfully running an on-site studio! 

 

More on this course will be announced later… For now, join our waitlist HERE to stay “in-the-know!”

 

3. Why you should open an on-site studio!

Please refer back to everything above. Haha! Seriously, we could talk about this topic for hours and share the multitude of benefits that this company has had for both Leah and myself. In fact, we have two more blog posts coming your way that detail more of these perks soon. Lindsey, one of our Studio Go teachers, will be sharing on-site dance from a teacher’s perspective, and Leah will be sharing some major benefits to her company specifically revolving around her family life. Spoiler alert. Her family life has enormously changed for the positive since she began operating on-site many years ago!

 

 

That’s all I have you today! Thanks for reading along and learning more about why I love on-site dance. I truly hope you’re interested and excited to here more about our “Beyond the Studio” Course. Don’t forget to sign up for the waitlist HERE, and send us a message if you have questions thus far!

Cheers,
Lauren 🥂